datadotworld

This web example will generate a Jupyter interactive notebook and populate it with the data dot world dataset that you specify

For a data.world URL snippet like this:

brianray/gapminder-prematurity-deaths-i

You would data enter below in the two boxes, splitting the owner out from the dataset name (and do not use slashes anywhere)

You could also "feed" this very web page to prepopulate these values by adding the following to your URL:

&parameter1=brianray&parameter2=gapminder-prematurity-deaths-i

Parameter 1

 

Parameter 2






show me test

     Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Pellentesque euismod nulla tellus. Praesent vel lorem quis lorem rutrum vulputate. Sed pellentesque turpis ligula, vulputate feugiat ante elementum nec. Integer ut lacinia metus, id auctor magna. Etiam blandit consectetur turpis, in bibendum sapien vulputate non. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Mauris vel lacus sapien. Nullam eget justo eu lorem viverra aliquam in at nunc. Donec non est massa. Aenean semper congue massa non tempor. Donec aliquet diam sed elementum interdum.

me ostendo

     Quisque condimentum lorem sed arcu scelerisque interdum. Curabitur at augue a mi viverra aliquam. Curabitur pellentesque dui malesuada lectus tempor mattis. Quisque malesuada leo in sollicitudin suscipit. Donec in dolor eu leo elementum bibendum nec vitae augue. Phasellus eu convallis magna. Nullam tincidunt velit vitae faucibus mattis. Phasellus eu odio id libero ornare facilisis. Cras adipiscing aliquet fringilla. Aenean at arcu in ipsum volutpat congue. Sed nibh lectus, dignissim ac sem sed, semper dictum quam. Morbi vel blandit neque, quis aliquet tortor. Phasellus tempor, ipsum vel egestas gravida, libero sem malesuada neque, sed posuere mi nisl id risus. Maecenas rutrum augue ante, a condimentum magna posuere ac. Donec id euismod elit, sed facilisis est. Praesent tempor, purus vel mollis venenatis, odio sem lobortis felis, in facilisis massa sapien non turpis. Donec et dolor tempus, tincidunt nunc et, semper velit. Pellentesque nec dolor augue. Suspendisse sit amet nulla non leo pulvinar bibendum a id quam.

     Sed non quam ullamcorper, tempor elit eu, interdum purus. Vivamus malesuada auctor libero, eu iaculis leo malesuada sit amet. Cras vehicula nibh quis neque tincidunt lacinia. Duis vel nulla ut tellus dapibus cursus a a velit. Phasellus pulvinar nisl sed elit luctus, sed bibendum elit rhoncus. Nam convallis hendrerit semper. Donec vel erat viverra, sagittis ante eu, rhoncus lacus. Vestibulum id lacus ante. Nam vitae venenatis quam. Nullam ac pellentesque quam. Vivamus vehicula lobortis mauris sit amet adipiscing. Sed pulvinar convallis tempor.

     Integer dictum metus et scelerisque elementum. Fusce semper lectus vel quam consectetur bibendum. Pellentesque vel venenatis ligula, a euismod risus. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Integer posuere ac ipsum ut dignissim. Vestibulum accumsan pellentesque justo non lacinia. Sed faucibus odio tempus elit pellentesque, eleifend congue nibh elementum. In ac convallis leo, ac tincidunt dolor. Etiam dapibus accumsan mattis. Nulla at leo et magna pharetra pulvinar non at tortor. Donec non nulla luctus, fermentum mi vitae, pulvinar libero. Morbi lectus nisl, ullamcorper et ante nec, aliquet auctor nulla. Curabitur non felis nibh.

     Nullam in felis nec ligula fermentum lobortis id sit amet metus. Sed dignissim at sapien eu lacinia. Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Phasellus ut elit felis. Fusce dapibus dolor non elit auctor aliquam. Pellentesque consequat nibh vitae ipsum iaculis, vel dignissim dolor tristique. Morbi ante ipsum, placerat eu dignissim in, porttitor id felis. Integer at sapien sed nisl elementum aliquam vel in est. Sed aliquam.

     Quisque condimentum lorem sed arcu scelerisque interdum. Curabitur at augue a mi viverra aliquam. Curabitur pellentesque dui malesuada lectus tempor mattis. Quisque malesuada leo in sollicitudin suscipit. Donec in dolor eu leo elementum bibendum nec vitae augue. Phasellus eu convallis magna. Nullam tincidunt velit vitae faucibus mattis. Phasellus eu odio id libero ornare facilisis. Cras adipiscing aliquet fringilla. Aenean at arcu in ipsum volutpat congue. Sed nibh lectus, dignissim ac sem sed, semper dictum quam. Morbi vel blandit neque, quis aliquet tortor. Phasellus tempor, ipsum vel egestas gravida, libero sem malesuada neque, sed posuere mi nisl id risus. Maecenas rutrum augue ante, a condimentum magna posuere ac. Donec id euismod elit, sed facilisis est. Praesent tempor, purus vel mollis venenatis, odio sem lobortis felis, in facilisis massa sapien non turpis. Donec et dolor tempus, tincidunt nunc et, semper velit. Pellentesque nec dolor augue. Suspendisse sit amet nulla non leo pulvinar bibendum a id quam.

     Sed non quam ullamcorper, tempor elit eu, interdum purus. Vivamus malesuada auctor libero, eu iaculis leo malesuada sit amet. Cras vehicula nibh quis neque tincidunt lacinia. Duis vel nulla ut tellus dapibus cursus a a velit. Phasellus pulvinar nisl sed elit luctus, sed bibendum elit rhoncus. Nam convallis hendrerit semper. Donec vel erat viverra, sagittis ante eu, rhoncus lacus. Vestibulum id lacus ante. Nam vitae venenatis quam. Nullam ac pellentesque quam. Vivamus vehicula lobortis mauris sit amet adipiscing. Sed pulvinar convallis tempor.

Epilogue

This used to be a thing. And will remain as such. However, we regret to inform you that this is the end. You can start over at this location, or, review the "Best of Show" as follows:


Team Geiger Rides Again

Tableau as a Web Application

Tableau "Show Me" built in javascript

Get Your Brasil On

Revisiting Sparklines

Cells Gone Bad

Multiple Trend Models

Fedscope Data

Multivariate Analysis

USA Uninsured Rates

Statistics Compendium

Radial Charts

Tableau Crayola Colors

I love the new crayola colors in the mac version of Tableau Desktop. It's totally *not* best-practice color choices, and it's totally awesome - I will try to get as many fortune 100 companies as possible to use these!! :)

Here is the dialogue. You have to double click a dimension on the color legend, then double-click again:

Tableau Server and Microsoft Azure

I sat down the other day to test an installation of Tableau Server and Microsoft Azure. I was able to provision a Tableau Server instance and a SQL Server instance, install some sample data, and create a viz - all in about an hour.

Here is a quick start guide on exactly what I did to achieve this... enjoy!

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B_Qy-VXfErJLTFhpNFJyUWlISDQ/edit?usp=sharing

Show Me

     Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Pellentesque euismod nulla tellus. Praesent vel lorem quis lorem rutrum vulputate. Sed pellentesque turpis ligula, vulputate feugiat ante elementum nec. Integer ut lacinia metus, id auctor magna. Etiam blandit consectetur turpis, in bibendum sapien vulputate non. In hac habitasse platea dictumst. Mauris vel lacus sapien. Nullam eget justo eu lorem viverra aliquam in at nunc. Donec non est massa. Aenean semper congue massa non tempor. Donec aliquet diam sed elementum interdum.

me ostendo

     Quisque condimentum lorem sed arcu scelerisque interdum. Curabitur at augue a mi viverra aliquam. Curabitur pellentesque dui malesuada lectus tempor mattis. Quisque malesuada leo in sollicitudin suscipit. Donec in dolor eu leo elementum bibendum nec vitae augue. Phasellus eu convallis magna. Nullam tincidunt velit vitae faucibus mattis. Phasellus eu odio id libero ornare facilisis. Cras adipiscing aliquet fringilla. Aenean at arcu in ipsum volutpat congue. Sed nibh lectus, dignissim ac sem sed, semper dictum quam. Morbi vel blandit neque, quis aliquet tortor. Phasellus tempor, ipsum vel egestas gravida, libero sem malesuada neque, sed posuere mi nisl id risus. Maecenas rutrum augue ante, a condimentum magna posuere ac. Donec id euismod elit, sed facilisis est. Praesent tempor, purus vel mollis venenatis, odio sem lobortis felis, in facilisis massa sapien non turpis. Donec et dolor tempus, tincidunt nunc et, semper velit. Pellentesque nec dolor augue. Suspendisse sit amet nulla non leo pulvinar bibendum a id quam.

     Sed non quam ullamcorper, tempor elit eu, interdum purus. Vivamus malesuada auctor libero, eu iaculis leo malesuada sit amet. Cras vehicula nibh quis neque tincidunt lacinia. Duis vel nulla ut tellus dapibus cursus a a velit. Phasellus pulvinar nisl sed elit luctus, sed bibendum elit rhoncus. Nam convallis hendrerit semper. Donec vel erat viverra, sagittis ante eu, rhoncus lacus. Vestibulum id lacus ante. Nam vitae venenatis quam. Nullam ac pellentesque quam. Vivamus vehicula lobortis mauris sit amet adipiscing. Sed pulvinar convallis tempor.

     Integer dictum metus et scelerisque elementum. Fusce semper lectus vel quam consectetur bibendum. Pellentesque vel venenatis ligula, a euismod risus. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Integer posuere ac ipsum ut dignissim. Vestibulum accumsan pellentesque justo non lacinia. Sed faucibus odio tempus elit pellentesque, eleifend congue nibh elementum. In ac convallis leo, ac tincidunt dolor. Etiam dapibus accumsan mattis. Nulla at leo et magna pharetra pulvinar non at tortor. Donec non nulla luctus, fermentum mi vitae, pulvinar libero. Morbi lectus nisl, ullamcorper et ante nec, aliquet auctor nulla. Curabitur non felis nibh.

     Nullam in felis nec ligula fermentum lobortis id sit amet metus. Sed dignissim at sapien eu lacinia. Vestibulum ante ipsum primis in faucibus orci luctus et ultrices posuere cubilia Curae; Phasellus ut elit felis. Fusce dapibus dolor non elit auctor aliquam. Pellentesque consequat nibh vitae ipsum iaculis, vel dignissim dolor tristique. Morbi ante ipsum, placerat eu dignissim in, porttitor id felis. Integer at sapien sed nisl elementum aliquam vel in est. Sed aliquam.

     Quisque condimentum lorem sed arcu scelerisque interdum. Curabitur at augue a mi viverra aliquam. Curabitur pellentesque dui malesuada lectus tempor mattis. Quisque malesuada leo in sollicitudin suscipit. Donec in dolor eu leo elementum bibendum nec vitae augue. Phasellus eu convallis magna. Nullam tincidunt velit vitae faucibus mattis. Phasellus eu odio id libero ornare facilisis. Cras adipiscing aliquet fringilla. Aenean at arcu in ipsum volutpat congue. Sed nibh lectus, dignissim ac sem sed, semper dictum quam. Morbi vel blandit neque, quis aliquet tortor. Phasellus tempor, ipsum vel egestas gravida, libero sem malesuada neque, sed posuere mi nisl id risus. Maecenas rutrum augue ante, a condimentum magna posuere ac. Donec id euismod elit, sed facilisis est. Praesent tempor, purus vel mollis venenatis, odio sem lobortis felis, in facilisis massa sapien non turpis. Donec et dolor tempus, tincidunt nunc et, semper velit. Pellentesque nec dolor augue. Suspendisse sit amet nulla non leo pulvinar bibendum a id quam.

     Sed non quam ullamcorper, tempor elit eu, interdum purus. Vivamus malesuada auctor libero, eu iaculis leo malesuada sit amet. Cras vehicula nibh quis neque tincidunt lacinia. Duis vel nulla ut tellus dapibus cursus a a velit. Phasellus pulvinar nisl sed elit luctus, sed bibendum elit rhoncus. Nam convallis hendrerit semper. Donec vel erat viverra, sagittis ante eu, rhoncus lacus. Vestibulum id lacus ante. Nam vitae venenatis quam. Nullam ac pellentesque quam. Vivamus vehicula lobortis mauris sit amet adipiscing. Sed pulvinar convallis tempor.

Inline Filtering using Tableau "Size" Calcs

This trick was too good not to pass up - Andrew Hill, Sales Consultant extraordinaire from Tableau, came up with this recently. Great stuff, Andrew!

The way it works is so simple and elegant. We use Tableau's built-in Size() function to filter certain sheets on a dashboard. We then use the built-in "keep only" feature on the tooltip. As the Size() changes, the sheets filter or disappear. Size() simply means "number of answers that the database gave us."

IPEDS Revisited

File under "how to break every Tableau rule in the book and thus create a poorly performing dashboard". Armed with a 70,000 row dataset from nces.ed.gov (specifically, the IPEDS longitudinal data set) I used parameters to allow the end user to select their desired metrics for correlation. I also have way too many filters on the filter shelf. The basic problem is that NCES has hundreds of metrics, all poorly named, all arcane, all requiring an excel file to look up their data definition. Many of them are ragged, meaning not all schools reported in all years. A brief scan of the metrics also shows me that definitions of metrics themselves change over the years.

I'm curious as to how other might solve this problem. I considered reshaping the 70k rows but with the number of metrics, it would end up in the tens of millions. Further, I would have a data model that is "too reshaped" or "too tall and narrow" for correlations.

If you are familiar with the common data set around IPEDS, you will be comfy using this dashboard. If you are not familiar with it... good luck! There's also a second tab with "additional filters" to refine your IPEDS criteria.

Home Energy Consumption Analysis with Tableau

Welcome to another entry in our guest blogger series, this time by Bronson Shonk on the Product Consulting team at Tableau. This exploration is so well-documented that I am going to just stop here. Except to say: great design work! I especially like the extensive help and thoughtful explanation.

Divvy Data Challenge Using Tableau

I had a couple of free hours the other day, so I decided to create and submit the following "mini application" to divvybikes.com and their recently announced data challenge. I am always reticent to enter contests, lotteries, or what have you - because I never win dammit! ... anyways, let's see what those Chicago startup folks think. Yet another fun waste of time using Tableau. Enjoy!


I want to:

See when and where riders are going

See station mapping info

Review rider demographics

Looks at a calendar

Research the bike I am using

Look at station distances

Study capacity planning

Individual Query Auditing with Tableau

Tableau Server has great built-in audit tables for who has looked at what content and when. We discussed this briefly in a previous post related to performance monitoring. What is NOT built-in to Tableau Server, however, is the ability to audit detailed field-level usage, or put in plain terms: who filtered what? (in other words, what was the resulting WHERE clause and WHO ran it?)

It turns out that if you are clever you can get this to work. Here's the brief overview of steps required:

  • In your database, enable tracing - this is not covered in this blog post!
  • Be prepared to report on this tracing. This could be with Tableau Desktop, or some other tool. In the example below, we used SQL Server and Tableau Desktop and only those two tools.
  • On all of your visuals, create a calculated field that tracks the current Tableau Server "Username". You also need to add a unique string with which to grep the answers later on.
  • Optionally, you can add this calculated field to Tableau data source filters - read more about that feature here and here. This is super awesome because it means that you will have enabled detailed auditing not just for Tableau Server web users, but also for any Tableau Desktop users as well!
  • In the example shown below, because we have a calc which results in "SPECIALTRACKINGKEY"+Username, we can then filter out all of the noise in our tracing data, and focus only on the Tableau query usage. Nifty.

In order to publish this workbook to Tableau Public, we first had to delete the magic calculated "tracking field" (Tableau Public does not support user filtering, and nor should it). Here is the definition of that field:

"SPECIALTRACKINGKEY" + Username()

You will need to add this back into your example in order for any of this to work. This subject is generally not for the faint of heart, so take your time and best of luck. Enjoy!

Individual database information for enabling SQL tracing (I'll try to add to this list as time permits):

Tableau Server Performance Monitoring

Analyzing Tableau Server performance is a complex beast. This is due to the fact that no one installation is like any other installation... makes sense. Tableau Inc. has some great built-in tools including the performance recorder as well as a white paper wherein they benchmark a given installation and response times.

But now what? This doesn't help us because as mentioned... all systems are different. A quick search on the web doesn't reveal much. It turns out that there are a few different disparate data sources that we can blend together into a unified view in order to analyze Tableau Server performance. They include:

  • Windows Performance Monitor
  • Tableau Server HTTP requests
  • Tableau Server audit events and
  • Tableau Server background tasks.

Here is a short list of steps to get this type of unified view; at which point, you could download the workbook shown below and swap out the data sources using the replace data source feature.

  • Enable the Custom Administrative Views feature of Tableau Server.
  • Learn about and enable Windows Performance Monitor. Tableau has a KB article to read. The workbook shown below uses 5-second intervals.
  • Take note that Tableau Server uses GMT Time. The workbook shown below uses a Tableau calculation called "Tableau Timestamp" to offset all relevant dates by 8 hours to pacific timezone in order to match my Windows perfmon timestamps. You will need to change this to your particular timezone.
  • The CSV output of your Windows Performance Monitor data collector will have really ugly field header names like "\\machineName\processName\PrivateBytes" - I changed these inside the workbook shown below - you will need to ensure that you can correctly swap the field names out with your own data.
  • Also note that the workbook shown below came from my laptop. I extracted all the data sources and inside the extract I filtered to "today only" which was Feb 6th, 2014. Obviously, you will want to disable extracts, or re-extract accordingly.

What's the point? Well here's the thing, folks ... instead of trying to come up with some repeatable statistic e.g.

  • "Total private Vizql RAM divided by number of unique users logged in" - this fails because you cannot predict how long a particular user sits on a viz, or, what the viz looks like, or, what the data source looks like, or
  • "Total RAM divided by HTTP requests" - this fails because there are lots of http requests for a given viz, or
  • "Total RAM divided by distinct users" - this fails because not all users are doing the same thing at the same time, or
  • Any number of other wacko stats.
...Instead of trying to do any of that, I recommend simple "immersion analysis". Immersion analysis is covered from several different angles in Dick Hauer's seminal work Psychology of Intelligence Analysis (it's a great read for numerous reasons - also free as a digital download, and no, I do not work for the CIA :) The basic premise of immersion analysis - specific to the Tableau Server platform and performance analysis - is that you should not be looking for a discrete and conclusive answer to the question of performance, e.g. "this thing times that thing must equal this other thing". Instead you should be using the available data to gather hypotheses with which to perform further research. Specifically, you are looking for:
  • Time Patterns: is there a spike or peak at a recurring or periodic time? (this is achieved with any of the data sources shown below)
  • Content Patterns: is there a particularly painful workbook or dashboard? (this is achieved by cross referencing RAM spikes against the audit tables. You will want to see which workbooks or dashboards were being looked at when the RAM spiked)
  • Task Patterns: Same as above, but this time you are cross-referencing background task details against RAM spikes (e.g. is a particular "refresh extract" pinning down Tableau Server?)

It might be considered a fruitless task to come up with known-good and reproducable performance benchmarks with the Tableau platform. Instead, you should gather information, come up with a hypothesis (e.g. a likely root cause for a performance spike), and then research the heck out of that hypothesis. Rinse, repeat, as needed. Download the workbook shown below to get started. Enjoy!


Tableau - The Bachelor Viz

Next up in our series of guest publishers... I present to you something which would have been quite impossible for me to have designed and built myself. :) All I can say is WOW what a design effort!

Created by expert Tableau Product Consultant Alex S. with help from additional Tableau staffers in the marketing department Maureen, Aliana and Mike, I consider the dashboard shown below to be an exquisite work of art which still provides a fundamentally solid data analysis experience. A beautiful meld of form and function, to be sure. What an excellent viz, Alex and bravo to Team Tableau in general!



Tableau Boeing 12th Man Flight Data

Boeing Inc. took their 747-8 out for a superbowl jaunt yesterday. Based upon flight tracking data from FlightAware located here, I ran the data through Tableau, added a couple of seahawks logo, and bam! 12th Man Viz... download this book and use the page shelf playback. Enjoy!


Tableau Server - Open Source Software Usage

Spoiler Alert: if you would like to skip my light-hearted rant against your pedantic desire to obsess about open source components, scroll down to see the actual list of components that can be found inside of Tableau Server.

From time to time I get asked a series of unfortunate questions about Tableau Server. Actually these are more like petulant demands from an IT manager more than actual questions ... Things like "what open source software does Tableau use?", "How do they test for open source vulnerabilities", or "we require an exhaustive list of all open source brands as well as their exact versions!", or even worse, "we want to swap out open source components with our own versions!"

Let's clear up some of this totes cray cray talk (translated: very crazy talk), shall we?

  • First things first: any respectable software vendor has zero obligation to tell you what kinds of software they use underneath the hood. In fact, doing so can be seen as a security flaw on their part. The less you know about their components, the less malicious people know about them as well. Security through Obfuscation. "Oh but now you're just using the NSA excuse," you may respond, "We are Edward Snowden, and we want answers!". Yeah, right. Tableau Server is not the NSA. You get to choose to use the software, and you get to choose to not use the software. Nice try...

  • Second... have you not downloaded Tableau Server and installed it? I bet you're one of those people who over think things. Download and install the software! These questions about components are largely irrelevant to actually using the software.

  • Third, don't ask if you can swap out the components inside of Tableau Server. This isn't a honda civic that is all souped up with aftermarket tail fins and other useless junk. It's an enterprise class analytics platform. Asking to change components is just rude...

  • Lastly, there's a dirty little secret - when if you stop to think about, is not really a secret and makes sense - which is that all software is open source software. At some point in the past, some genius invented some type of software doohicky that does some kind of awesome thing - and then that person shared it with the world. Ever use email? Does your computer send TCP packets? Yeah... that.


OK, so now that I am mostly done ranting :), let's take a look at an actual installation of Tableau Server and see what we can find.

  • First location to look at is the bin directory. On my laptop this is "C:\Program Files\Tableau\Tableau Server\8.1\bin".

  • Right away, I can tell that Tableau Server is framed out with an Apache/Tomcat installation. Great! What version? Who cares! Tableau manages this for us - have you not been reading? (OK just kidding, the version is 7.0.41 and the release notes are located here: C:\Program Files\Tableau\Tableau Server\8.1\tomcat)

  • Wait, Apache? What's that? It's a web server. It's open source and is included with Tableau. The version notes are located here: C:\Program Files\Tableau\Tableau Server\8.1\apache

  • It's very clear from an initial glance at the files that Java is the predominant language for Tableau functionality. War files, jar files, and so forth. Massive amounts of evidence. What version you ask? Who cares. (OK just kidding, java info is located here: C:\Program Files\Tableau\Tableau Server\8.1\repository\jre)

  • back in the bin directory, we can also see some other open source items. fbclient.dll for example is a Firebird Database Client. Anything with QT in it is QT Code. Duh...

  • There's clearly a database - I mean, all web based enterprise software has to store info somwhere, right? In Tableau Server's case check out this location: C:\Program Files\Tableau\Tableau Server\8.1\pgsql

Not enough? You think I might have missed something? I bet I did. So in that case, download and install Tableau Server, and then read this RTF document at the top level of the installation:

C:\Program Files\Tableau\Tableau Server\8.1\COPYRIGHTS.rtf

This file contains a reference - for legal purposes - to every single case where Tableau Server uses third party software. Click on that, IT nerds...

Tableau: Vaccine-preventable outbreaks

This simple dashboard is a reproduction of an existing visualization located here. This was a simple experiment to see how I could reduce screen real estate as well as eliminate the classic "Best viewed with the following specific browsers" warning. Mission achieved! It's also an interesting data set being mined in a rather manual fashion, all by catching news/media articles as they are released.


Exploits Dashboard

I'm starting a new theme in 2014 which is to have guest visuals on this site. This is partly because I am lazy (read: 100% because I am lazy). For a modest fee of exactly zero dollars and zero cents, you too can rent this space. Act soon to get in on this hot, hot visual action! This week we have a great dashboard from Brian Deely, one of the expert Product Consultants at Tableau Software.

At first glance you might think, "hey this viz is kind of simple. Where's the crazy Alan Smithee ridiculousness that I am used to seeing?". But here's the thing: I LOVE THIS VIZ. It's so simple. There's an elegance to it. It was so easy to create - it literally took Brian all of 2 minutes to build this. The goal of the viz is crystal clear. He left almost all of the default formatting untouched (except for the black. Nice one, Brian. I love black)

Those of us who are viz nerds - the vizarati of the BI world so to speak - get all worked up over advanced features and solutions. We sometimes forget what the whole point is: Fast. Easy. Fun.

With that, I give you Brian's exploit dashboard:


Tableau Server - Compendium of Links


Happy Holidays 2013 Tableau Edition

Happy Holidays in 2013!! I was trying to solve a pretty simple problem and got a little carried away. The problem was to calculate the military format for "durations" - e.g. convertings seconds into DD:HH:MM:SS format. F5/Refresh this page to update the viz. I could have also added a forced javascript refresh, or better yet, a full blown image retrieval and slideshow example... but that would have been sort of spammy to the Tableau Public infrastructure. :) Enjoy!